What can I do with the data?

What can I do and where should I be cautious?

Using the Youth Homelessness Databank

Viewing the number of homeless young people in each area... 

For each local authority, the Youth Homelessness Databank displays all those counted in official homelessness statistics from central government. Where Centrepoint have been able to collect the data from local authorities, the Youth Homelessness Databank also displays the number who presented as homeless or at risk of homelessness, who were assessed under the Housing Act (1996), those who accepted as statutorily homeless and those that were given prevention and relief support.

You can also switch between viewing the data as total numbers of young people or as rate a per 1,000 young people in each area.

Comparing the data across different council areas... 

You can compare the youth homelessness figures for more than one local authority or region. Using contextual data such as youth population, deprivation index and area type you can explore wider differences in these areas. 

Downloading the data... 

Clicking on 'Donwload data' at the top of each data page will allow you to download a .csv file of the data currently on display. You can then run your own analysis. We've done some of our own analysis, which you can read more about on the Centrepoint website.

Sharing your analysis...

The Youth Homelessness Databank data is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. This license allows you to distribute, remix, tweak and build upon our work, as long as Centrepoint and the Youth Homelessness Databank are credited for the original creation.

Ask the Youth Homelessness Databank Team a question...

If you have any questions about what you can and can't do with the data, send us an email.

Sharing the Youth Homelessness Databank pages... 

Share via Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and email.  

Things to bear in mind

Data from the different countries is not directly comparable ... 

England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland all have different policies on homelessness and as such local authority level data across them is not comparable. In Scotland, for example, the proportion of young people who are accepted and owed a housing duty will be far higher than in England as those presenting in Scotland do not need to meet the 'priority need' criteria that young people in England do.

Some of the data is incomplete...

The local authority data for England represents all the Freedom of Information responses we received, but we did not receive a response from every area. Further, in some areas that did respond, the local authority did not provide all the data requested. Therefore some local authorities have some or all their data missing. 

The data has been collected and defined in different ways...

Local councils have many different ways of collecting or reporting their data. With this in mind, the information in the Youth Homelessness Databank should be taken as an estimate.

The data has been anonymised...

It is standard practice to anonymise government and local council data that reveals less than five cases, to protect the anonymity of individuals. This can negatively affect the data, making it less accurate. 


Data published by central government on statutory homelessness acceptances in England is anonymised at a quarterly level. So that this data can still be included, the redacted figures have been replaced by 2 for the Youth Homelessness Databank. This is why a number of local authorities have a statutory homeless figure of 8 in the government data tab - an estimate of 2 has been used in each quarter.  These figures should therefore also be considered as an estimate.

There could be duplication...

As all data is provided in aggregate format, the Youth Homelessness Databank is not able to de-duplicate or otherwise clean the data. This may occur if, for example, the same individual has presented to their local authority twice within the same year or presented to two different local authorities.

The local authority data is published exactly as it is reported...

In order to remain fully transparent, the local authority level data collected through Freedom of Information request in England is published without any edits. Therefore there may be some inconsistencies for a local authority. For example, the number of prevention and relief cases may be higher than the number of young people that presented to their local authority as homeless or at risk of homelessness, or the number of assessments may be exactly equal to the number of presentations. In these cases, treat the data with caution as it is not possible to know what the correct figure is.